Thursday, May 27, 2010

Solar Cooling - Air Conditioning From the Sun



by: Hans Dekker

At first glance, solar cooling looks like an oxymoron. However, the same energy that can provide heat in the wintertime can also provide cooling during the summer.

Several passive cooling systems have been developed and tested. At their simplest, they rely on a coolant that absorbs and dissipates heat from the house. This could be a pool of water on the rooftop which absorbs seat from the inside of the house as it evaporates on exposure to the sun.

More sophisticated passive solar cooling systems have a solar collector which is shaded during the daytime. A storage medium collects heat during the day and dissipates it at night by exposing the solar collector to the cool night air.

Since the solar collector must be shaded, a retractable awning or overhang extension can be installed. Since the system can be reversed in the winter months, it is important that the solar collector can be exposed to sunshine if needed.

Solar panels can also be used to operate traditional air conditioners. As it happens, the periods of intense heat correspond to the periods of peak electricity production from photovoltaic cells. As long as you have solar panels which generate sufficient to electricity, you can operate air conditioners at no cost.

Solar cooling that does not take advantage of high technology is another possibility. The Romans used a system of running water to cool down exterior walls of their houses. The heat of the sun causes the water to evaporate and dissipate the heat within the house. This kind of system can be used on walls or on rooftops.

Heating and cooling are two of the biggest expenses for most households. Using solar energy to reduce this expense makes sense financially as well as ecologically. The less dependent we are on fossil fuels for heating and cooling the cleaner the environment will be.

About The Author

Hans Dekker is author at http://www.alternative-energy-guide.com/ the energy site for "non techies".

Improving your home and your life only at Home Improvement Idea : http://home-improvement-idea.blogspot.com

Thursday, May 20, 2010

Prevent Water Damage in the Laundry Room


by: Terry Allen

The washer and drier are usually located in the laundry room and create heat and moisture. Simple maintenance is required to help avoiding water problems and mold.

The Washer

The washer is connected to both cold and hot water lines. Check them frequently. Start with the joints and fix a leak if you find it. Be sure to check both ends of the water lines. Clean or replace the filters once in a while. A blocked filter will slow the water flow into the washing machine, and may cause some malfunctions. This problem is worse in areas with “hard water”. Inspect the shut off valve by looking for drips into the washing machine while it is not in use. If you detect a leak, replace the valve.

Hoses & Filters

Like in most appliances, problems often start in the hose. Keep at least 4 inches between the water connection and the back of the washer. This space will prevent the hose from kinking and bursting. Check the hoses and replace them if old. Consider installing steel-braided hoses.

The Dryer

The dryer is connected to a ventilation hose. Check it carefully. The dryer ventilation hose must be connected to the outdoors. Search for lint behind and under the dryer and make sure the vent pipe is not clogged. Make the exhaust short as possible for the dryer to vent efficiently,

Utility Sink

The utility sink is sometimes the source for water related problems. Search for leaks under the sink. A drip in the trap under the sink can be a sign for problems and should be repaired immediately. Slow draining pipes may indicate a partially blocked drain. A constantly dripping faucet must me repaired promptly. Replace sink seals if they are cracked or loose. Damped or stained walls around plumbing pipes indicate an internal leak that must be fixed before additional damage occurs.

For more information visit www.RestorationSOS.com

Free guides are available

About The Author

Terry Allen is an editorial staff member of RestorationSOS™, a leading restoration services provider for water and fire damages.

To learn more about water and fire damage prevention, visit http://restorationsos.com

terrya@restorationsos.com

Improving your home and your life only at Home Improvement Idea : http://home-improvement-idea.blogspot.com

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